We all know bigger is better, but what about when you can’t afford to get bigger? Fortunately, a limited budget doesn’t have to limit your success at a trade show. Follow the simple tips below to ensure your share of attendee traffic, whatever the size of your exhibit.

1. PUT YOUR BOOTH FRONT AND RIGHT
When you go into a store for the first time, do you turn left or right? Most people will head right when entering an unknown space. So, if your booth can’t be front and center, consider front and right. Chances are, you’ll get people just starting their trade show experience – and ready to learn about your product.

2. STUDY THE TRADESHOW FLOOR PLAN FOR TRENDS OR CLUSTERS
When you sign up for a show, get a copy of the most current floor plan, with existing exhibitors already filled in. See if you can spot any clusters of exhibitors forming. Sometimes, show management will group exhibitors of a common theme together. For example: all the paper manufacturers will be grouped together.

3. OPT FOR END OF THE ROW
If you exhibit with a 10*10 or 10*20, your options will be limited. Realize this and plan accordingly. End of the row will give you a much more open and inviting space since one side of your exhibit will not be blocked by another display. And, you’ll have more flexibility when planning your own booth’s layout.

4. GET NEAR A MAJOR EXHIBITOR IF YOU OFFER A COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCT
Find out about the major show sponsor and the exhibitor with that big booth front and center. If your offering works well with theirs, being close to them makes sense. This way, you can catch their customers and educate them about your service or product.

5. STAY IN THE MAIN EXHIBIT HALL
We’ve all been to shows with a main exhibit hall and a side hall, or where booths are set up outside the main entry. Having a booth away from the bulk of attendee traffic is far from ideal. If you register in advance, there is no way you should be anywhere but inside the main hall.

Trends in the trade show industry show that attendees now spend much more time researching and planning their exhibit hall visits. Great news if you’re stuck on the back wall, but there’s also more pressure to have your pre-show promotional program in place. If attendees don’t know about you before the show, you’re going to have a hard time catching their attention when they arrive.